Plantation Pines

Taeda

Common Uses

Balsam
Balusters
Chemical containers
Paneling
Tool handles
Species Distribution
   


Numerical Values

     
Category Green Dry Unit
Bending Strength
Crushing Strength (Perp.)
Max. Crushing Strength
Impact Strength
Stiffness
Work to Maximum Load
Hardness
Shearing Strength
Toughness
Specific Gravity
Weight
Density (Air-dry)
Radial Shrinkage (G->OD)
Tangential Shrink. (G->OD)
Volumetric Shrink. (G->OD)
7300
390
3510
30
1400
8
690
1390
210
0.47
53
36
5 %
7 %
12 %
12800
790
7130
30
1790
10
--
--
--
0.51
36
--
--
--
--
psi
psi
psi
inches
1000 psi
in-lbs/in3
lbs
psi
in-lbs
--
lbs/cu.ft.
lbs/cu.ft.
--
--
--

Species Distribution

Countries
United States
Argentina
Brazil
Uruguay
South Africa

Physical and Environmental Profile

Environmental Profile

The environmental status of this species within its natural habitat has not been officially assessed.

Distribution
Loblolly pine is reported to be native to fifteen southeastern states in the United States. Its range is reported to extend from southern New Jersey south to central Florida, west to eastern Texas, and north to the far southeastern region of Oklahoma. It grows on various soil types, from deep, poorly drained flood plains to well-drained slopes of rolling, hilly uplands, and it often forms pure stands, usually on abandoned farmlands. It is reported to grow from sea level to an elevation of 1500 to 2000 feet (457 to 610 m).

Product Sources
It is currently unknown whether timber from this species is available from sustainably managed or other environmentally responsible sources.

The primary commercial southern pine, Lololly pine is reported to be among the fastest growing of the southern pines, and is widely planted in forest plantations for pulpwood and lumber.

The following species in the database is reported to be as dense and as strong as Loblolly pine:
Parana pine (Araucaria angustifolia)

Tree Data
Loblolly pine is described as a large, resinous, and fragrant tree. It usually matures to a height of about 80 to 100 feet (24 to 30 m) and a diameter of about 24 to 36 inches (60 to 90 cm).

Heartwood Color
The wood is initially pink brown, and matures to a slightly darker color upon exposure. Sapwood is not distinct from the heartwood.

Grain
Grain is described as closed, with high figuring, and pattern ranges from clear to knotty.

Texture
The texture is fine and even.

Odor
There is no distinct odor or taste.

Ease of Drying
The material is reported to dry, but conditions should be controlled to prevent excessive degrade.

Drying Defects
There is a tendency for the timber to distort and check during drying.

T/R Ratio - 1.40
This indicator is more meaningful if it is used together with other drying information and actual shrinkage data in the tangential and radial directions. (Refer to the Numerical Values window).

Natural Durability
Heartwood resistance to decay is reported to be moderate. The sapwood is reported to be vulnerable to powder-post beetle attack and is prone to stain.

Resistance to Impregnation
The heartwood is reported to be difficult to penetrate with preservatives, but the sapwood is treatable.

Cutting Resistance
n/a

Planing
The timber is reported to work fairly well but some material may pick up during planing. A reduced cutting angle is recommended.

Turning
The timber is reported to work easily in turning and most machining operations.

Moulding
Moulding operations are reported to be generally easy.

Boring
The material is reported to respond well to boring.

Routing & Recessing
Routing operations are reported to be relatively easy.

Mortising
Mortising characteristics are reported to be good.

Carving
Carving characteristics are rated as generally good.

Gluing
Gluing characteristics are reported to be good.

Nailing
The timber is reported to have good nailing and nail-holding qualities.

Screwing
Screwing and screw-holding characteristics are reported to be good.

Sanding
Frequent sandpaper changes are recommended since resin in the wood tends to clog up sanding materials.

Polishing
Polishing properties are rated as good.

Strength Properties
Bending strength and crushing strength of air-dried wood are fairly high. The wood is soft, and surfaces may dent easily. It is heavy and dense.

Comments
Loblolly pine, like all the other Southern pines, is reported to have many characteristics that are similar to Douglas-fir. Wood produced by old-growth Southern pine trees is reported to be generally higher in density and more stable.

Reference Sources

Numerical Data Source
USDA. 1987. Wood Handbook - Wood as an Engineering Material, Forest Service, Agriculture Handbook No. 72, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin.

Descriptive Data Source
Panshin, A.J. and C. deZeeuw. 1980. Textbook of Wood Technology, 4th Edition. McGraw-Hill Series in Forest Resources. McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York.

Mirov, N.T. 1967. The Genus PINUS. The Ronald Press Company, New York. LCC Card No. 67-14783.

Kaiser, Jo-Ann. Wood of the Month: Southern Pine - The Commercial Name for 10 Species. Wood & Wood Products, June, 1991.

Little, E.L. 1980. The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Trees - Eastern Region. Published by Arthur A. Knopf, New York.

NWFA. 1994. Wood Species Used in Flooring. Technical Publication No. A200. National Wood Flooring Association, Manchester, MO.

Boone, R.S., C.J. Kozlik, P.J. Bois and E.M. Wengert. 1988. Dry Kiln Schedules for Commercial Woods: Temperate and Tropical. United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, General Technical Report FPL-GTR-57, Madison, Wisconsin.

USDA. 1988. Dry Kiln Operators Manual, Preliminary Copy. Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin.

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